Best East Frisian tea

  • Harney & Sons
  • Misc.
  • Named after the popular tea drunk by the East Frisians of...
  • A blend of hearty Assam that is lightened by Darjeeling and...
  • Try it layered with cream and crystallized sugar.
  • Named after the popular tea drunk by the East Frisians of...
  • A blend of hearty Assam that is lightened by Darjeeling and...
  • Try it layered with cream and crystallized sugar.
  • Tea Category: Black Orthodox Tea
  • Quantity: 75g
  • Packaging:in a Black Jap Caddy - 77x77x100mm
  • A stiff cup with electric astringency and weighty notes of...
  • The bright copper liquor of this blend of Assam, Java and...
  • Ingredients: Blend of Assam, Java and Ceylon black teas
  • Amount: 1-2 teaspoons/8oz. cup

Strong tea blend from 20 different tea varietiesThe name Ostfriesentee is not protected under trademark law. The black tea blend consists mainly of Assam tea with additions of Darjeeling and Ceylon tea. East Frisia’s large tea trading houses Onno Behrens, Hünting and Thiele each offer their own tea blends. Because only a composition of many tea sorts enables a high and above all constant product quality. Therefore other tea houses call their product “Ostfriesische Mischung”. The name Ostfriesentee may only be used if the tea has been blended in the region. The main component of the East Frisian tea is the north Indian Assam tea. Its taste is very strong and reminiscent of honey or malt. The rich tea is well suited for hard water. In 1823 a traveller from Scotland observed how the inhabitants prepared a drink from wild tea bushes. In the years to come, Assam’s wild tea was crossed with Chinese tea plants, which still yield the best yields today. Assam is the world’s largest tea-growing region. The Ceylon tea tastes medium strong and bitter. It is slightly reminiscent of malt, sometimes also of citrus fruits. Suitable for hard water, tea is one of the most productive varieties. Ceylon is the former name for today’s Sri Lanka. Tea has been grown here since 1870. Well-known areas for tea cultivation are Nuwara Eliya, Dimbula and Uva. The best qualities are harvested at an altitude of 1,200 metres. Since tea plants do not tolerate waterlogging, they are sufficiently supplied with air humidity at high altitudes. The Indian Darjeeling tea has a fine and flowery taste. It belongs to the expensive tea sorts and is not suitable for hard water. In 1866 the first 30 tea gardens were established in the Darjeeling region. Today about 70,000 people are employed in the cultivation, care and harvesting of tea. Tea culture in East FrieslandIn East Friesland tea plays an important role. From this the East Frisian tea culture or tea ceremony developed in the past centuries. The tea time (Ostfriesisch Teetied) is still today an essential part of society and culture. It is estimated that the East Frisians drink 300 litres of tea a year. They are the global leaders in tea consumption. The Assam variety, which produces a dark and strong cup colour, is particularly popular in East Frisia. Tea replaced beer as a popular drink in East Frisia at an early stage. Even if tea had to be imported, it proved to be cheaper for most people at that time. Tea was first brought to Europe by Dutch ships. Around 1675 tea was still considered medicine. Already in 1720 an active tea trade had developed in East Frisia. Teehaus Bünting was founded in 1806 and is still one of the largest employers in the region today. With the import of tea, the first porcelain reached Europe by sea. From the 18th century onwards, tea tableware was produced for the first time in a local manufactory. It consisted of a pot, a can and a cup. Later, tea shovels, sugar tongs and cream spoons were added. The tea museums in Leer and Norden show the correct preparation of East Frisian tea. First rinse the teapot with hot water. Only then pour the East Frisian tea into the pot. One teaspoon of tea is used per person. Now fill the jug halfway with boiling water, close the lid and let everything stand for 3 to 4 minutes. Then completely fill the teapot with hot water and pour the finished tea through a sieve into the serving pot. Pour a piece of white or brown rock candy (Kluntje) into the empty cup. Only now pour the hot tea over it, so that a characteristic crackling can be heard. Now pour the cream into the hot tea with a suitable spoon at the side edge of the cup until a so-called “cream cloud” is formed. The traditionally prepared East Frisian tea is drunk without stirring. Guests must drink at least 3 cups of tea. It is considered rude by hosts to refuse before. The main time for tea is at 3:00. In East Frisia, a tea break at 11 o’clock or an evening tea at 21 o’clock is now common in families. Afternoon tea is often served with a slice of tea cake from the baking tray, which is elsewhere known as butter cake.

Our Top East Frisian tea Pick

Drugstore articles: East Frisian tea Video Guide

TOP 5 East Frisian tea Bestseller

East Frisian, Loose tea in 4 Ounce tin
  • Named after the popular tea drunk by the East Frisians of Northern Germany
  • A blend of hearty Assam that is lightened by Darjeeling and Ceylon
  • Try it layered with cream and crystallized sugar.
EAST FRISIAN BLEND, BROKEN - black tea - in a Tea Caddy - Ø 98 mm, height 135 mm (100g)
  • Tea Category: Black Orthodox Tea
  • Quantity: 100g
  • Packaging: In a Tea Caddy - Ø 170 mm, height 220 mm
East Frisian Broken Blend (loose leaf tea, black tea) (100 grams)
  • A stiff cup with electric astringency and weighty notes of tobacco and caramel.
EAST FRISIAN SPECIAL BROKEN "LECKER TEETIET" - black tea - in a Black Jap Caddy - 77x77x100mm (75g)
  • Tea Category: Black Orthodox Tea
  • Quantity: 75g
  • Packaging:in a Black Jap Caddy - 77x77x100mm
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